TXAI

Facing the Itacarezinho Beach in the northeast of Brazil, Txai House recovers principles previously investigated by studio mk27 ten years earlier, as in the Du Plessis House (2001-2003): the project merges elements of colonial and vernacular residences – in this case the colorful Bahian houses – with precise modern lines.

To avoid verticalization, the house lays on the plot in two blocks on different levels, without any floor overlapping. This solution ended up creating a new configuration for the land, like a second nature emerging from the original profile, as in Paraty House (2006-2009). Invariably, the projects of studio mk27 place the view as the defining aspect of the project. Here, this is done by using the topography of the site – which rises 13 meters: the view, hence, is not achieved by verticalization of the house, but by its placement in the highest part of the plot.

Since the beginning, clients had demanded a radical integration between local nature and architecture. The house on two different levels created an inevitable external path through the garden between the living room and bedrooms. There are no internal staircases and using spaces means eventually being in the rain. Dwellers, hence, experience different climactic conditions as they go from inside to out.

On the lower floor, the living room – an open space, protected by a prestressed flat slab – turns into a large veranda when windows frames are completely recessed. Spans of 9.7m X 6.3m shape the structural modulation, in a rational domino system.

On the upper floor, bedrooms – inside the wooden and stucco colored volumes placed under the gable roof – open to a 2.5m-wide veranda where traditional hammocks hang from the demolition wood ceiling. The bathrooms are completely open to the exterior, having their own individual gardens defined by walls, like patios.

Gabriel Kogan

TXAI

location > itacaré . bahia . brasil
project > march . 2011
completion > december . 2014
site area > 6.450 sqm
built area > 640 sqm
-
architecture and interior design > studio mk27
architect > marcio kogan
co-architect > carolina castroviejo . gabriel kogan
interior design > diana radomysler
architecture team > paula sertório
interiors team > mariana ruzante
communication team > carlos costa . laura guedes . mariana simas
-
structure engineer > benedicts engenharia
contractor > RFM
-
photographer > fernando guerra

Facing the Itacarezinho Beach in the northeast of Brazil, Txai House recovers principles previously investigated by studio mk27 ten years earlier, as in the Du Plessis House (2001-2003): the project merges elements of colonial and vernacular residences – in this case the colorful Bahian houses – with precise modern lines.

To avoid verticalization, the house lays on the plot in two blocks on different levels, without any floor overlapping. This solution ended up creating a new configuration for the land, like a second nature emerging from the original profile, as in Paraty House (2006-2009). Invariably, the projects of studio mk27 place the view as the defining aspect of the project. Here, this is done by using the topography of the site – which rises 13 meters: the view, hence, is not achieved by verticalization of the house, but by its placement in the highest part of the plot.

Since the beginning, clients had demanded a radical integration between local nature and architecture. The house on two different levels created an inevitable external path through the garden between the living room and bedrooms. There are no internal staircases and using spaces means eventually being in the rain. Dwellers, hence, experience different climactic conditions as they go from inside to out.

On the lower floor, the living room – an open space, protected by a prestressed flat slab – turns into a large veranda when windows frames are completely recessed. Spans of 9.7m X 6.3m shape the structural modulation, in a rational domino system.

On the upper floor, bedrooms – inside the wooden and stucco colored volumes placed under the gable roof – open to a 2.5m-wide veranda where traditional hammocks hang from the demolition wood ceiling. The bathrooms are completely open to the exterior, having their own individual gardens defined by walls, like patios.

Gabriel Kogan