Modern-colonial subject present at Du Plessis House (2001-2003) reappears in Bahia House. Context dictated here project premises: the relationship with traditional “Bahian” houses; the plot occupation to take advantage of predominant winds; and the use of local materials – such as the stones in the walls and demolition wood for living room ceiling.

Due to the high-temperatures in Salvador (a summertime average of approximately 80°F/27ºC), project radically sought to thermal comfort with low energy consumption. In internal spaces, for example, hollowed-out wooden panels shade the indoors without blocking the fresh air. Additionally, program organization around the patio – defined, above all else, to respect pre-existing mango trees in the middle and front of the plot – shaped a plan propitious to cross-ventilation in all spaces.

In the living room that can completely open out to both sides, wooden door frame design incorporated mashrabiyas on the upper part of each piece, both for cost reduction due to smaller glass area and permanent ventilation even when the house is closed, for example, during holidays.

This solution of the patio-house appears in colonial constructions as well as in modern Brazilian works, such as the Rothchild House (1965) by Oscar Niemeyer.

Gabriel Kogan

BAHIA

location > salvador . ba . brazil
project > february . 2007
completion > april. 2009
site area > 2.165 sqm
built area > 690 sqm
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architecture and interior design > studio mk27
architect > marcio kogan
co-architect > samanta cafardo . suzana glogowski
interior design > diana radomysler
architecture team > henrique bustamante . oswaldo pessano . sergio ekerman
communication team > mariana simas
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landscape designer > renata tilli
structure engineer > v&n engenheiros associados
contractor > eng construtora
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photographer > nelson kon

Modern-colonial subject present at Du Plessis House (2001-2003) reappears in Bahia House. Context dictated here project premises: the relationship with traditional “Bahian” houses; the plot occupation to take advantage of predominant winds; and the use of local materials – such as the stones in the walls and demolition wood for living room ceiling.

Due to the high-temperatures in Salvador (a summertime average of approximately 80°F/27ºC), project radically sought to thermal comfort with low energy consumption. In internal spaces, for example, hollowed-out wooden panels shade the indoors without blocking the fresh air. Additionally, program organization around the patio – defined, above all else, to respect pre-existing mango trees in the middle and front of the plot – shaped a plan propitious to cross-ventilation in all spaces.

In the living room that can completely open out to both sides, wooden door frame design incorporated mashrabiyas on the upper part of each piece, both for cost reduction due to smaller glass area and permanent ventilation even when the house is closed, for example, during holidays.

This solution of the patio-house appears in colonial constructions as well as in modern Brazilian works, such as the Rothchild House (1965) by Oscar Niemeyer.

Gabriel Kogan